Equitable Internet Initiative (EII), – Building their own wireless networks

https://youtu.be/1B0u6nvcTsI

red text that says what is community technology?, and a red illustrated building with a router on topPublished on Nov 16, 2017

When it comes to the internet, our connections are generally controlled by telecom companies. But a group of people in Detroit is trying to change that. Motherboard met with the members of the Equitable Internet Initiative (EII), a group that is building their own wireless networks from the ground up in order to provide affordable and high-speed internet to prevent the creation of a digital class system. Check out CNET’s channel for more: http://bit.ly/2gpeXdr Subscribe to MOTHERBOARD: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-To-MOTHERBOARD Follow MOTHERBOARD Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/motherboardtv Twitter: http://twitter.com/motherboard Tumblr: http://motherboardtv.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/motherboardtv More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideo

https://youtu.be/1B0u6nvcTsI

 

Riverwise Issue 3 – Now Available

Note from Eric Campbell Riverwise Editor:

Look for issue 3 of Riverwise at area bookstores, grocers, cafes and community spaces today!

easter8-top1a.jpg
Look for issue 3 of Riverwise at area bookstores, grocers, cafes and community spaces today!
easter8-top2a.jpg
riverwiseMag_Summer2017_R8_lwe (1) 2
——————————–

(A bonus column from Riverwise editorial member, Shea Howell)

Changing Schools

Shea Howell

Labor Day has passed, and people are returning to schools systems in crisis. Nationally, the Secretary of Education, Betsy DeVos, has vowed to destroy public schools.  Her commitment is to private, religiously based schools. Recently, Julian Schmoke, Jr. joined her as the Director of the Student Aid Enforcement.  He comes to us from DeVry University which was just forced to pay a massive $100 million to settle a lawsuit for lying to students. Michigan, home state of Betsy DeVos, and long suffering from her meddling, ranks at the bottom on national tests. State spending for education at all levels is among the lowest in the country and has dropped 14% since 2007-2008 for colleges and universities. Detroit with a new Superintendent and some measure of local control for the first time in two decades faces teacher shortages, turmoil and lack of basic supplies. The annual ritual of beginning school is fraught with anxiety, uncertainty and lack of care for the emotional and intellectual well being of far too many of our young people.

When a system is facing this much dysfunction, it is time for us to ask deeper questions. Certainly DeVos and her cronies, emergency managers, state interference and irresponsible legislatures have their share of the blame in creating this chaos. But this crisis comes from a more fundamental problem.  Our system of education no longer has a clear vision or purpose.

School years begin after Labor Day as a reflection of our agricultural heritage. Hands were needed to harvest and preserve foods. Schooling happened after the work was done. As industry replaced agriculture, schooling became necessary to do the work of an expanding economy. Schooling happened so people could do jobs.

Tying schools and education to the demands of work has always had its critics, spurring some of the most progressive and thoughtful efforts to enable young people to develop as full, responsible, creative human beings.  More than 100 years ago, John Dewey published Democracy and Education. In the shadow of WWI and facing a rapidly changing society, Dewey offered ways to think about education as a creative process to help people develop themselves and their society humanly in the face of ongoing change. But these efforts have never been at the core of US schools. For most people, schooling has been about jobs, skills and survival.

Today, it is obvious to everyone most schools are little more than containment camps for children. Daily practices are tied to mastering information for meaningless tests designed to advance a few at the expense of the many. Clearly we need to shift to a new paradigm for education.

In arguing for this paradigm shift in our thinking, Grace Lee Boggs, a student of Dewey’s and educational philosopher, wrote in The Next American Revolution, “Our schools must be transformed to provide children with ongoing opportunities to exercise their resourcefulness to solve the real problems of their communities. With younger children emulating older ones and older children teaching younger ones, they can learn to work together rather than competitively and experience the intrinsic consequences of their own actions. Children will be motivated to learn because their hearts, hands, and heads are engaged in improving their daily lives.”

Across the country, people are evolving ways to educate one another to transform schools and communities. They understand that young people are not problems to be contained, but have the energy, imagination and desire to create communities that reflect the best in us. All of us concerned about the future need to find ways to support and enhance these efforts.

for a copy send Name Address and $5.00 to Riverwise 3061 field st Detroit, Mi  48214

 

easter8-bottom2.jpg

July 15, 2017 – IT’S TIME TO BREAK OUR SILENCE!- IT’S TIME TO BREAK OUR SILENCE! Edit Link

July 15, 2017 – IT’S TIME TO BREAK OUR SILENCE!- IT’S TIME TO BREAK OUR SILENCE!

July  2017 in Upcoming Events. Leave a Comment

July15 2017 flyer

IT’S TIME TO BREAK OUR SILENCE!

An open invite to friends & neighbors of Macomb County

WHAT KIND OF WORLD AND COMMUNITY CAN WE ENVISION TOGETHER?

JULY 15 from 2 – 4PM at Grace Episcopal Church (115 S. Main Street, Mt. Clemens 48043)

~ Sponsored by the James and Grace Lee Boggs Center to Nurture Community Leadership ~

“We have a great

opportunity to

create beloved,

caring

communities…But

first, we must break

our silence and

have safe, serious

conversations

about our history

and how we got to

this point.”

CONTACT US AT:

vickymazzola@gmail.com

(586) 531-7576

River Wise – Saturday, June 24, 2017 at the Feedom Freedom – Community Conversation

 In the interest of expanding the traditional role of a community publication,
Riverwise magazine is continuing its series of ‘community conversations’ in various
neighborhoods throughout the city. We hope to support the wide range of visionary activism
taking place in Detroit by providing not only the story content, but a forum for further
engagement through careful dialogue.
Our next gathering will take place Saturday, June 24, 2017 at the Feedom Freedom
urban garden from 1-3pm. The emphasis that Feedom Freedom has placed on community
empowerment provides a suitable setting in which to discuss the past, present and future of
Riverwise magazine and the people that support it. Feedom Freedom’s motto, “Grow a garden,
grow a community,” falls right in line with the mission of Riverwise magazine to grow the
community by telling our own stories with our own voices.
Feedom Freedom is located at 866 Manistique, Detroit, Michigan, 48215. For more
information, call 313-247-4771.
With the recent publication of our second edition, the Riverwise Collective urges our
readers to join us to discuss the potential to expand our political consciousness and social
responsibility through storytelling. Please join us to reflect on the direction of the magazine,
story ideas for upcoming issues and a viable future based on evolving ideas.
In love and struggle,
Eric T. Campbell
Project Manager
Riverwise Magazine

Boggs Center – Living For Change News Letter – March 6, 2017